Supreme Court Rules Police Cannot be Sued for Failing to Read Suspect Miranda Warning

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In a landmark, pro-police ruling issued on June 23, the U.S. Supreme Court decided that police officers cannot be sued for failing to read a suspect a Miranda warning. This ruling counters a 2021 San Francisco based ruling that failing to read Miranda warnings violated Fifth amendment rights, which opened the door to frivolous lawsuits.

It’s no surprise that criminals and their lawyers will try and find any way to avoid just consequence. Therefore, allowing lawsuits for failing to make a statement during arrest is a dangerous precedent.

However, according to a provision provided with the ruling, violating a suspect’s Miranda rights shall block the use of any incriminating statements from being used in court.

This is a big win for both law enforcement and individual rights. It sets a precedent that officers cannot be sued over technicalities and that citizens’ Fifth amendment rights are still being upheld. This is a good day for justice.

Upholding the law is not easy, but with this decision, the Supreme Court has made it clear that they are on the side of police officers who uphold their oaths to protect and serve.

Unfortunately, many will protest any form of support for law enforcement. In fact, if you search for this ruling on the most popular search engines all you will see is anti-police articles condemning this ruling.

What do you think, is this a good ruling? Should suspects be allowed to sue for failure to receive their Miranda warning? How do you feel about the other recent Supreme Court decisions? Let us know in the comments below.

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