U.S. Green Beret's Take Down High Value ISIS Target Despite Overwhelming odds

U.S. Green Beret's led the charge during a raid on a rural compound in Samarra, Iraq in September 2007.

However, during the mission, an Iraqi insurgent's bullet pierced Staff Sgt. Jarion Halbisen-Gibbs's gut. Despite the injury, he and his fellow Green Berets continued fighting, taking down 12 insurgents.

Halbisen-Gibbs's heroic actions during the mission has been recognized with the Distinguished Service Cross award, which is the second-highest medal for valor that a soldier can get.

Two of his fellow soldiers, Captain Matthew A. Chaney and Sergeant 1st Class Michael D. Lindsay, will receive the Silver Star.

Initial Contact

In September 2007, Staff Sgt. Jarion Halbisen-Gibbs and his team, consisting of about 20 U.S. and Iraqi troops, were on a raid on a rural compound in Samarra, Iraq. Halbisen-Gibbs was leading the charge, and together with Capt. Matthew A. Chaney and Sgt. 1st Class Michael D. Lindsay, they stormed one of the buildings and detonated a grenade while firing their weapons.

Almost immediately, Chaney was shot in the pelvis, and Lindsay was shot in the throat. The force of an enemy grenade threw Chaney and Lindsay out of the building.

The same blast threw Halbisen-Gibbs into a corner inside the building.

The Fight Continues

Although Lindsay was vomiting, hyperventilating, and almost too weak to even hold his rifle, he refused to give up.

He pulled out his handgun and began firing toward the insurgents. Chaney, who had lost feeling in his legs, took cover behind an insurgent's body while firing and yelling to other team members.

Shrapnel from the insurgents' grenade had mangled Halbisen-Gibbs's thumb, but he continued to fight.

Halbisen-Gibbs was shot in the abdomen, but he shot and killed the insurgent who injured him and rallied the Iraqi government troops to press on with the attack.

Although none of the U.S. or Iraqi government troops were killed, Halbisen-Gibbs, Chaney, and Lindsay were all injured.

Halbisen-Gibbs, Chaney, and Lindsay each required at least two medical operations and both had sections of their intestines removed.

Recognition for Their Heroic Actions

The Army recognized the bravery and valor of Halbisen-Gibbs, Chaney, and Lindsay in their written account of the action, stating that they "acted with the utmost of bravery and valor to remove a heavily armed and entrenched enemy stronghold."

The three soldiers credit their training for allowing them to remain focused and think clearly despite the chaos and danger. They emphasized that the training helps them manage stress and fear.

The heroic actions of Staff Sgt. Jarion Halbisen-Gibbs, Capt. Matthew A. Chaney, and Sgt. 1st Class Michael D. Lindsay during the September 2007 raid in Samarra, Iraq, are a testament to the bravery and dedication of our soldiers.

Their actions in the face of danger demonstrate the critical importance of military training, which enables them to think and make sound decisions under high-stress situations.

Halbisen-Gibbs received the Distinguished Service Cross award, and Chaney and Lindsay received the Silver Star.

Their unwavering commitment to the mission and to each other is a shining example of the best of the U.S. Army.

Most Recent Stories

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

3 comments on “U.S. Green Beret's Take Down High Value ISIS Target Despite Overwhelming odds”

  1. Incredible young men, doing what they trained to do and paid the price for their bravery. Thank you all for your sacrifice, thank you for your service and for your courage.

  2. There's no military in the world today that is that strong or brave as the men and women who serve in our military. May our Lord bless them all.

  3. God Bless these Green
    Berets, I am glad they got out of there, how brave they
    are. And for them to
    fight so hard to kill
    the enimeas.

Copyright 2023, Thin Line News LLC